Welcome to INSIGHT pain management

Sensing pain is a part of human nature, but identifying and treating the source of the pain can be much more complex than one may realize. As trailblazers in pain management, we focus on using various methods of treatment, including physical rehabilitation and the use of the latest technology for the best results.

Whether you suffer from chronic headaches, back pain, joint pain, or sciatica, we have a treatment plan for you. We can help alleviate pain through a multitude of modalities, ranging from medication management and injection therapy to interventional procedures and aquatic therapy. We are able to offer what no other pain management clinic can because we are a part of a larger institution with neurosurgery, MRI, physical therapy, chiropractic, and fitness facilities all under one roof. We pride ourselves in making the patient experience and satisfaction our top priority.

Back Pain Treatment

In order to understand back pain treatment options, you should know a little about the structure of your spine.

Your spine is composed of 24 ring-like bones called vertebrae. The “rings” of each vertebra align to form a column in your back, which is referred to as your spinal column.

Your “spinal cord” extends from the base of your brain and runs down the length of your spinal column, ending at the top of your lumbar spine where it continues farther down your spinal column as a bundle of nerves.

Your spinal cord is protected by a thin membrane called dura mater, and the epidural space is a small space that surrounds the dura mater.

Nerve roots branch off your spinal cord and exit your spinal column through an opening called the neural foramen. These nerves extend into your arms, back, and legs. If something is irritating your nerve roots, such as a bulging or herniated disc, pain can be felt along the entirety of the nerve.

 

Hours of

Operation

Monday – Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Services Provided


Medication Management and Pain Management Methods:

Our team can help you manage your pain with both prescription and non-prescription methods. Together with your physician, we will determine a medication regimen that appropriately manages your pain. Our primary goal is to get you out of pain and do so as effectively as possible while keeping you safe. Therefore, we follow applicable federal and state guidelines in our prescribing practices, and each patient is subject to a urine drug screen at each visit.

We understand that undergoing an injection can be a nerve-racking experience. In an effort to relieve any anxiety and discomfort, we have an on-duty certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) to provide sedation for almost every procedure.

Depending on recommendations by your doctor, options for pain management may include:

Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections

Overview: This injection procedure is performed to relieve neck, shoulder, and arm pain related to compression of a nerve root in the cervical spine. Conditions such as herniated discs and spinal stenosis can compress nerves, causing inflammation and pain. The medication injected helps decrease the swelling of nerves.

Vertebra and Nerve Root Located The physician uses a fluoroscope to locate the appropriate cervical vertebra and nerve root. A local anesthetic is applied to numb the skin.

Tissue Anesthetized All the tissue down to the surface of the vertebral transverse process is anesthetized.

Needle Inserted The physician slides a thin needle with a slightly curved tip through the anesthetized track. Foraminal Space Accessed With the aid of the fluoroscope, the physician carefully guides the needle into the foraminal space near the nerve root.

Contrast Dye Injected The physician injects a contrast solution and uses the fluoroscope to confirm the correct position of the needle tip. Steroids Injected A steroid-anesthetics mix is injected into the foraminal epidural space, bathing the painful nerve root with soothing medication.

End of Procedure The needle is removed, and a small bandage is applied. In most cases, the patient will be able to return home the same day.

Thoracic Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection

Overview This injection procedure relieves pain in the upper back, ribs, and abdomen caused by a pinched nerve (or nerves) in the thoracic spine.

Preparation The procedure is performed with the patient lying on the stomach. A region of skin and tissue of the back is numbed with an injection of local anesthetic.

Inserting the Needle The physician uses an x-ray device called a fluoroscope to guide a needle to the painful area of the spine. The needle is inserted into the neural foramen space, the region through which spinal nerves travel.

Confirming the Needle Placement Contrast dye is injected into the space to make sure the needle is properly positioned near the irritated nerve or nerves.

Injecting the Medication A combination of an anesthetic and cortisone steroid solution is injected into the foramen space. The steroid is an anti-inflammatory medication that is absorbed by the inflamed nerves to decrease swelling and relieve pressure.

Contrast Dye Injected The physician injects a contrast solution and uses the fluoroscope to confirm the correct position of the needle tip. Steroids Injected A steroid-anesthetics mix is injected into the foraminal epidural space, bathing the painful nerve root with soothing medication.

End of Procedure and After Care The needle is removed and a small bandage is applied. Extended pain relief usually begins within two to three days of the injection. Some patients may need only one injection, but two or three injections may be needed to provide significant pain relief.

Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection

Overview  This injection procedure relieves pain in the upper back, ribs, and abdomen caused by a pinched nerve (or nerves) in the thoracic spine.

Preparation The procedure is performed with the patient lying on the stomach. A region of skin and tissue of the back is numbed with an injection of local anesthetic.

Inserting the Needle The physician uses an x-ray device called a fluoroscope to guide a needle to the painful area of the spine. The needle is inserted into the neural foramen space, the region through which spinal nerves travel.

Confirming the Needle Placement Contrast dye is injected into the space to make sure the needle is properly positioned near the irritated nerve or nerves.

Injecting the Medication A combination of an anesthetic and cortisone steroid solution is injected into the foramen space. The steroid is an anti-inflammatory medication that is absorbed by the inflamed nerves to decrease swelling and relieve pressure.

End of Procedure and After Care The needle is removed and a small bandage is applied. Extended pain relief usually begins within two to three days of the injection. Some patients may need only one injection, but two or three injections may be needed to provide significant pain relief.

Cervical Epidural Steroid Injections

Overview This injection relieves pain in the neck, shoulders, and arms caused by a pinched nerve (or nerves) in the cervical spine. Conditions such as herniated discs, spinal stenosis, or radiculopathy can compress nerves, causing inflammation and pain. The medication injected helps decrease the swelling of nerves.

Patient Sedated The procedure is performed with the patient lying down. Intravenous sedation may be administered, and a region of skin and tissue of the neck is numbed with a local anesthetic delivered through a small needle.

Needle Inserted Using x-ray guidance (also called fluoroscopy), the physician guides a larger needle to the painful area of the neck. The needle is inserted into the epidural space, which is the region through which spinal nerves travel.

Steroid Injected A combination of an anesthetic and cortisone steroid solution is injected into the epidural space. The steroid is an anti-inflammatory medication that is absorbed by the inflamed nerves to decrease swelling and relieve pressure.

End of Procedure The needle is removed and a small bandage is applied. The patient goes to a recovery room and is given food and drink and discharged with post treatment instructions. Some patients may need only one injection, but it may take two or three injections (administered two weeks apart) to provide significant pain relief.

Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection

Overview This outpatient procedure is an injection performed to relieve pain in the upper back.

Preparation The patient sits or lies down to expose the back. The back is cleaned and sterilized, and a local anesthetic is administered to numb the tissue of the injection site down to the spinal column.

Inserting the Needle The physician uses an x-ray device called a fluoroscope to guide a needle down to the vertebra that is causing the pain. The needle is carefully pushed into the epidural space, which is the area surrounding the spinal cord. A contrast solution is injected to confirm the needle’s position.

Inserting the Medication The physician injects a steroid-anesthetic mix into the epidural space, bathing the painful areas with soothing medication. The mixture will help reduce inflammation and reduce pain.

End of Procedure The needle is removed, and the injection site may be covered with a small bandage. Extended pain relief usually begins within three to five days of the injection. In some cases it may be necessary to repeat the procedure as many as three times to get the full benefit of the medication. However, many patients get significant relief from only one or two injections.

Cervical Facet Blocks

Overview These injections help your doctor find or treat pain in the facet joints of your neck. Facet joints are found on both sides of your spine. Your vertebrae connect at these joints.

Preparation To begin, your skin is numbed. With the help of a video x-ray device called a “fluoroscope,” the doctor guides a needle to the target facet joint.

Medication Injected The doctor injects medicine into the joint. The medicine numbs your nerves. It can reduce inflammation. Your doctor may inject facet joints at more than one level of your spine.

End of Procedure You may feel relief immediately. If so, that means your doctor has found the joint or joints causing your pain. Your doctor can repeat the procedure with longer-lasting medicine to help provide long-term relief. Your healthcare provider can create a plan that’s right for you.

Facet Blocks

Overview The facet joints, found on both sides of the back of the spine, can become painfully irritated or inflamed. A facet joint injection may help diagnose the source of a patient’s pain. It can also relieve pain and inflammation.

Skin Numbed In preparation for the procedure, the physician numbs the skin and tissue above the facet joint with an injection of local anesthetic.

Placement Confirmed With the aid of an x-ray device called a fluoroscope, the physician guides a needle through the numbed tissue and into the facet joint. Contrast dye is injected into the joint to confirm the needle’s placement.

Medication Injected Once the needle is positioned properly, the physician injects a soothing mixture of numbing anesthetic and anti-inflammatory steroid medication. One or more facet joints may be treated. If this causes the pain to subside, it suggests that the facet joint (or joints) injected were the cause of pain.

End of Procedure Back or neck pain may disappear immediately after a successful injection because of the anesthetic that is administered. As this anesthetic wears off, pain may return. The steroid will begin to take effect in the days after the injection. The steroid will reduce inflammation and pain. The injection can provide relief for a span ranging from several days to several months. Up to three injections may be given per year.

Rhizotomy / Radiofrequency Ablation

Commonly referred to as an RFA, a rhizotomy is a therapeutic procedure that uses radiofrequency waves to desensitize the nerve and stop the transmission of pain signals.

Botox Injections for Migraines

Overview If you have the frequent, severe headache condition known as “chronic migraine,” your doctor may want you to try injections of BOTOX® in your head and neck. The injections can help stop migraines before they start. 

What is BOTOX? What is BOTOX? BOTOX is a brand name for a protein called “botulinum toxin.” When injected in small doses, this protein is very good at blocking nerve signals. It can block the nerve signals that are linked to some headaches. When these are blocked, you won’t feel a migraine. 

The Injection During the BOTOX procedure, your doctor gives you a series of injections. They go in specific spots in your head and neck. The needle is small, and the injections aren’t painful. They feel like tiny pinpricks. The entire injection procedure takes about fifteen minutes. 

Conclusion If the injections help stop your headaches, your doctor may recommend a continuing care plan. You may be asked to come back for more injections every three months. Your healthcare provider can create a care plan that’s right for you.

Trigger Point Injections

Overview This outpatient procedure is designed to reduce or relieve the pain of trigger points. These small, tender knots can form in muscles or in the fascia (the soft, stretchy connective tissue that surrounds muscles and organs). The trigger point injection procedure takes only a few minutes to complete. 

Preparation In preparation for the procedure, the patient is positioned comfortably. The physician presses and pinches the skin to locate the trigger point. Once it has been identified, the physician cleanses the overlying skin. A topical anesthetic may be used to temporarily numb the skin. 

Medication Injected The physician carefully inserts a needle through the skin and into the trigger point. The physician injects an anesthetic mixture into the trigger point. This causes the trigger point to relax. If the trigger point does not relax completely after the first injection, the physician may adjust the needle’s position and give additional injections.

End of Procedure When the injection is complete, the physician removes the needle. A small bandage may be placed over the injection site. The patient may be encouraged to stretch and move the muscle after the injection.

Intra-articular Shoulder Joint Injections

Overview This outpatient injection procedure relieves pain in the shoulder and arm caused by arthritis, injury or disorder. 

Preparation In preparation for the procedure, the shoulder is cleaned and sanitized. A local anesthetic is administered to numb the tissue at the injection site. The physician may choose from multiple needle approaches, depending on which part of the shoulder requires treatment. Needle Insertion The physician carefully guides a needle into the shoulder joint. The physician may guide the needle with the help of an x-ray device called a fluoroscope. If so, the physician may inject contrast dye to confirm the needle’s placement. 

Pain Relief Injection When the needle is in position, the physician injects a mixture of anesthetic and steroid medication. The medication will help reduce inflammation and relieve pain. 

End of Procedure When the injection is complete, the needle is slowly withdrawn. The injection site may be covered with a small bandage. For many patients, extended pain relief begins within two to three days of the injection. In some cases, it may be necessary to repeat the procedure one or more times to receive the full benefit of the treatment.

Intra-articular Knee Joint Injection

Overview This non-operative, outpatient procedure is designed to provide relief for patients with arthritis of the knee. The technique allows the physician to inject an inflammation-reducing steroid with maximum accuracy. 

Preparation The physician swabs the knee, injects a numbing medication and positions a special X-ray device called a fluoroscope. 

Injecting the Dye To make sure the medicine injection gets to the space inside the joint, the physician first uses an injection of dye. The dye shows up on the fluoroscope image. If the dye pools in the soft tissue at the front of the knee, the physician adjusts the needle placement. 

Finding the Target Area When the dye reaches the target area – the space inside the joint – the physician is ready to inject the medication. 

Injecting the Medication The rear of the syringe is removed from the needle and a syringe filled with a local anesthetic and steroid is attached. The physician injects the medication into the joint. 

End of Procedure The local anesthetic and steroid solution in the knee joint will reduce inflammation and pain. The injection can be repeated if necessary.

Intra-aricular Hip Joint Injection

Overview This outpatient injection procedure relieves hip, leg or buttock pain caused by arthritis or other damage to the hip joint. 

Preparation The patient lies down, and the hip is cleaned and sterilized. Local anesthesia is administered to numb the tissue at the injection site.

Needle Insertion The physician may use an x-ray device called a fluoroscope to guide a needle to the hip joint. Contrast dye is injected to confirm the needle’s position. 

Pain Relief Injection A mixture of anesthetic and steroid medication is injected into the joint to reduce inflammation and relieve pain. 

End of Procedure The needle is slowly withdrawn, and the injection site may be covered with a small bandage. Extended pain relief usually begins within two to three days of the injection. In some cases it may be necessary to repeat the procedure up to three times to receive the full benefits of the treatment.

Discogram

Overview This procedure, also called a “discogram,” helps your doctor find painful spinal discs. It can show the source of pain in your back. To see how it works, let’s watch a discography done in the thoracic spine. 

Preparation To begin, you lie down and you are given medicine to help you relax. You will still be awake. That’s so you can tell your doctor what you feel during the procedure. Your mid back is numbed with local anesthetic.

Placing the Needles The doctor uses a video x-ray device called a “fluoroscope” to carefully guide a needle into the target disc. If more than one disc is being tested, a needle is placed into each one.

Testing the Discs Next, the doctor injects contrast dye into each disc, one at a time. The dye raises the pressure inside the discs. When this happens, you may feel pressure or pain. If you feel pain, that may be a sign that the disc is diseased. The doctor will take images with the fluoroscope so your discs can be studied carefully.

End of Procedure and Aftercare When the procedure is done, the needles are removed. Before you leave, your doctor may want to get a more detailed scan of your discs. Discography can cause your back to be slightly sore for a few days. Your healthcare provider will give you tips to help ease this minor pain.

Kyphoplasty

Overview This minimally-invasive procedure repairs a vertebral compression fracture. It helps restore the spine’s natural shape. Some patients experience rapid pain relief after the procedure. 

Preparation Before the procedure, you are anesthetized. The physician guides a needle through the skin of your back and into your fractured vertebra. A special x-ray device called a “fluoroscope” helps the physician position the needle. 

Balloon Inserted A balloon device is placed through the needle and into the vertebral body. The physician carefully inflates this balloon to expand the fractured bone. When the balloon is deflated, it leaves a cavity in the middle of the vertebral body. The balloon is removed. For some patients, more than one needle and balloon may be used. 

Fracture Stabilized The physician injects bone cement through the needle. This cement fills the cavity. It hardens inside the vertebral body, stabilizing the fracture. 

End of Procedure and Aftercare When the procedure is complete, the needle is removed. The opening in your skin is closed. Your doctor will give you instructions to aid your recovery.

Spinal Cord Stimulator

Overview Spinal cord stimulation (also called SCS) uses electrical impulses to relieve chronic pain of the back, arms and legs. It is believed that electrical pulses prevent pain signals from being received by the brain. SCS candidates include people who suffer from neuropathic pain and for whom conservative treatments have failed. 

Trial Implantation The injection site is anesthetized. One or more insulated wire leads are inserted through an epidural needle or through a small incision into the space surrounding the spinal cord, called the epidural space. 

Find the Right Location Electrodes at the end of the lead produce electrical pulses that stimulate the nerves, blocking pain signals. The patient gives feedback to help the physician determine where to place the stimulators to best block the patient’s pain. The leads are connected to an external trial stimulator, which will be used for approximately one week to determine if SCS will help the patient. 

Determine Effectiveness If the patient and physician determine that the amount of pain relief is acceptable, the system may be permanently implanted. At the end of the trial implantation, the leads are removed.

Carpal Tunnel Injections

If diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome we can inject steroids to reduce inflammation and swelling around the median nerve in the wrist to alleviate symptoms.

Sacroiliac Joint Injections

Overview This injection procedure is performed to relieve pain caused by arthritis in the sacroiliac joint where the spine and hip bone meet. The steroid medication can reduce swelling and inflammation in the joint. 

Sacroiliac Joint Located The patient lies face down. A cushion is placed under the stomach for comfort and to arch the back. The physician uses touch and a fluoroscope to find the sacroiliac joint. 

Anesthetic Injected A local anesthetic numbs the skin and all the tissue down to the surface of the sacroiliac joint. Needle Inserted The physician advances a needle through the anesthetized track and into the sacroiliac joint. Steroids Injected A steroid-anesthetics mix is injected into the sacroiliac joint, bathing the painful area in medication. 

End of Procedure The needle is removed, and a small bandage is used to cover the tiny surface wound.

Ganglion Impar Blocks

A ganglion impar block is used to treat chronic pelvic and tailbone pain

Treatment for Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis)

We offer steroid injections for tennis elbow, which is an inflammation of the tendons that connect the muscles of the forearm to the elbow. The pain is primarily felt at the lateral epicondyle, the bony bump on the outer side of the elbow.

Trigeminal Nerve Blocks

Overview A trigeminal nerve block treats facial pain associated with trigeminal neuralgia by injecting medication into the nerve

TMJ Injections

Overview This procedure involves injecting medication into the temporomandibular joint to reduce pain and discomfort from the inflammation and irritation occuring within the joint. 

PATIENT CARE SECOND TO NONE

That is our core value and is at the heart of everything we do. Nothing comes before our patients’ health and well-being, and we are driven by a passion to help others regardless of any obstacles and challenges that may lie ahead.

Meet Our Pain Management Team

Siva K. Sripada, D.O.

Anesthesiology & Pain Management

Dr. Siva Sripada is board-certified in anesthesiology as well as in pain management. He completed his medical training at the University of North Texas HSC in Fort Worth, Texas. He then went on to complete his anesthesia residency at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas.

After working as an anesthesiologist in the greater Dallas area, he went back to receive his subspecialty training in pain management from Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. Dr. Sripada has been working exclusively as a pain management specialist in the southeast Michigan area for over 10 years. He is dedicated to providing a variety of treatment options for his patients to help them manage chronic pain.

Vincent Rampersaud, M.D.

Orthopedic Surgery & Pain Management

Dr. Vincent Rampersaud has been practicing orthopedics and pain management since 1998. He trained in orthopedics at Wayne State University and has had extensive training in pain, spine, joints and hand injuries. He has been focused on pain management in private practice since 2009. Dr. Rampersaud provides a variety of medical, interventional and surgical treatment options for the treatment of chronic pain along with bone and joint injuries.

Salah Eldohiri, M.D.

Anesthesiology & Pain Management

Dr. Salah Eldohiri is board-certified in anesthesiology and pain management and finished medical school at Mansoura, Egypt in 1996. He later completed his residency at State Suny New York, New York in 2003. Dr. Eldohiri is part of the Genesys PHO, and today he is proud to care for his past, present, and future patients at the Insight Pain Management Center.

Sushruth Shenava, M.D.

Pain Management

Dr. Sushruth Shenava is skilled in anesthesiology and pain management and has been in practice since 2011. After anesthesiology training, he began focusing solely on pain management. Dr. Shenava offers a variety of procedural, behavioral, and medical options for the treatment of chronic pain, with an emphasis on improved functionality and daily living.

Racheal Smith

Manager at Insight Pain Management

Racheal earned her Bachelor’s Degree in Healthcare Administration from the University of Michigan-Flint in May of 2014. She joined Insight Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience in May of 2014 as the front desk medical assistant at Insight Imaging. With hard work and dedication she quickly moved up to the Neurosurgery Clinic where she was Dr. Shah’s medical assistant, she was later promoted in to management. In her spare time Racheal enjoys spending time with her wonderful family, friends, and her dog Chloe.

Allison Piatt, ACNP-BC

Nurse Practitioner

Allison Piatt, ACNP-BC, is a board-certified nurse practitioner with a specialty in acute care. She completed her nurse practitioner degree with honors from Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri. She completed her nursing degree at the University of Michigan in Flint, Michigan.

Allison had six years of experience as a registered nurse taking care of step-down and ICU surgical patients at area hospitals before pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner. She also worked in general surgery as a nurse practitioner prior to joining Insight in July 2014. Allison sees her patients at Hurley Medical Center, Genesys Regional Medical Center, and McLaren Regional Medical Center and is an integral part of the Insight team. She will on occasion also see patients at Insight Pain Management.

Joe Danko, AGACNP-BC

Nurse Practitioner

Joe Danko, AGACNP-BC, is a board-certified nurse practitioner with a specialty in acute care gerontology. He earned his bachelor’s degree as a registered nurse at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. He went on to complete his master’s degree at Madonna University in Livonia, Michigan.

Joe worked in the medical ICU, pre-op, and recovery room at St. John Hospital in Detroit for 11 years before joining Insight in February 2016. Joe sees patients in the Insight Pain Management Center as well as Hurley Medical Center, Genesys Regional Medical Center, and McLaren Regional Medical Center.

Julie Widzinski, NP

FNP-BC

Julie Widzinski, FNP-BC, is a board-certified nurse practitioner. She earned her first bachelor’s degree in Biology and Sports Medicine at Adrian College and then shortly after, received her bachelor’s degree in Nursing at the University of Detroit Mercy. She went on to complete her master’s degree at Chamberlain University in Chicago, Illinois, graduating with honors. 

Julie began her career in the emergency room and then moved to the neuro/medical intensive care unit at McLaren Flint. Julie worked for McLaren for 11 years before joining Insight Insitute in June of 2020. Julie sees patients in the Insight Pain Management Center, as well as Hurley Medical Center, Genesys Regional Medical Center, and McLaren Flint. 

Kris Swanson

Chief Operating Officer

Kris Swanson earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Alma College in May 2001 and later earned his master’s in business administration from Central Michigan University in May 2002. Since then he has been a manager at INSIGHT since 2012 and has played a crucial role in developing INSIGHT Pain Management when it opened in 2012.

Alyssa Doyle, FNP-BC

Alyssa Doyle, FNP-BC, is a board-certified nurse practitioner. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Saginaw Valley State University. Alyssa worked as a registered nurse for five years in the Emergency Department at Hurley Medical Center and as a pre/post-op nurse at The Vascular Institute of Michigan.
Alyssa went on to complete her master’s degree from the University of Michigan- Flint and began with Insight Institute in February of 2021. Alyssa sees patients in the Insight Pain Management Center, as well as Hurley Medical Center, Genesys Regional Medical Center, and McLaren Flint.