Insight Imaging

Insight Imaging Center offers MRI, CT Scan, and X-ray services. We have a 24- to 48-hour turnaround time on all reports, and as always, speedy scheduling and availability.

Used for different purposes, MRIs, MRAs, MRVs, and CT scans can be taken of most areas of the human body.

  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): MRI is advanced technology that allows the physician to see internal organs, blood vessels, muscles, joints, tendons, and more. Insight offers MRIs for the head, extremities, spine, and general body such as the torso and pelvis.
  • Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA): MRA is used to detect disease in the aorta and blood vessels that supply the kidneys, lungs, and legs. Insight offers MRAs for the head/brain, carotid, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and lower extremity.
  • Magnetic Resonance Venography (MRV): MRV is used to visualize veins. Insight offers MRVs of the head and brain.
  • Computed Tomography (CT): A CT scan uses a combination of X-rays and a computer to create pictures of your organs, bones, and tissues. A CT scan can be taken on any part of the body.
  • We offer a Wide Bore MRI for patients that are claustrophobic or overweight every other Saturday. Wide bore MRI systems have allowed radiologists to offer patients the optimized comfort of conventional open bore systems, as well as the high-quality imaging of conventional closed bore systems. Because wide bore MRIs have broadened the demographic of patients who can be tested, the systems have gained widespread adoption in use, with many practices opting to equip their offices solely with wide bore systems. Please contact us for more details.

Please call (810) 275-9688 for all of your imaging needs! Your patients are our top priority.

services we offer

Head MRI
  • MRI Brain
  • Pituitary
  • I.A.C
  • Orbits
  • MS Protocol
Spine MRI
  • Cervical Spine
  • Soft Tissue Neck
  • Thoracic Spine
  • Lumbar Spine
  • Sacrum/Coccyx
Extremity MRI
  • Shoulder
  • Brachial Plexus
  • Humerus
  • Elbow
  • Forearm
  • Wrist
  • Hand
  • Hip
  • Femur
  • Knee
  • Tibia/Fibula
  • Ankle
  • Foot
Body MRI
  • Abdomen
  • MRCP
  • Pelvis
  • Sacroiliac Joint
MRA'S
  • MRA Head/Brain
  • MRV Head/Brain
  • MRA Carotid
  • MRA Chest
  • MRA Abdomen
  • MRA Pelvis
  • MRA Lower Extremity

insight imaging faq

What is an MRI?

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is advanced technology that allows the physician to see internal organs, blood vessels, muscles, joints, tendons, and more. MRI examinations may be ordered with or without contrast (IV dye). MRI is very safe. There are no known harmful effects! MRI will NOT expose you to any ionizing radiation.

 

  • Hand Injuries
  • Parkinson’s
  • Arthritis
  • Stroke
  • Fractures
  • Head Injury
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Joint Replacement
  • Spinal Cord Injury
How does a MRI machine work?

The MRI machine uses the body’s own energy, along with a magnetic field, and highly-sophisticated computers to see through bone to create precise pictures of soft tissue. Radio frequency waves are used to cause hydrogen protons in the body to resonate or “vibrate”. The energy of the “vibration” is collected with an “antennae” (called a coil) in almost the same way as your radio antennae receives signals from a local radio station. The computer then organizes these signals into an electronic image of the anatomy.

Why is my physician ordering a MRI?
MRI provides extremely detailed images of your body unobtainable from other procedures such as X-ray and CT scans without the ionizing radiation that X-ray and CT give. MRI can provide very early detection of many conditions. If there are any abnormalities, MRI can show the location, size, and extent of those abnormalities. The excellent quality of the imaging can provide the best possible information if surgery is required.
For neurological imaging, MRI provides the most sophisticated visualization of the brain and spine available for diagnostic image testing. MRI assists in the early detection and diagnosis of the brain and nervous system disorders including, but not restricted to, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), tumors, stroke, hydrocephalus, spinal disease, and many traumatic injuries. MRI for orthopedic imaging and sports medicine closely visualizes joints, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage.
For Restoration of Physical Function:
  • Decreased upper extremity strength/ROM
  • Unable to sit unsupported
  • Unable to safely negotiate walker or w/c in surroundings
  • Needs assist in bed mobility or transfers
  • Decreased coordination
Are there restrictions for MRI exams?
Yes. MRI scans CANNOT be performed on patients with a cardiac pacemaker, brain aneurysm clips, metallic fragments in the eye(s), or metallic inner ear prosthetics. For those patients with metallic injuries (metal in the eyes, bullets, shrapnel, etc.), and could not have MRI imaging since the incident, the patient will be asked to have a X-ray done to clear them of any metallic fragments prior to their examination with Insight Imaging. MRI machines use a strong magnetic field which will move metal objects, made with iron or steel, within the body, and can affect the function of electronic devices. The patient will be asked screening questions prior to scheduling, as well as be asked to fill out the MRI Patient Screening Packet upon arrival to help assure the patient’s safety.
Is there any special preparation for MRI exams?
No special preparation is required unless IV contrast is ordered. If IV contrast is ordered and the patient has high blood pressure, diabetes, or history of kidney disease, lab results (GFR) must be available within the previous 4 – 6 weeks. If there are no lab results available, the patient must have them done 48-72 hours prior to their MRI appointment. The patient will be asked all of the screening questions again to make sure that no questions were missed. You will be asked to remove all metallic items including clothing with any metal and all jewelry. You will be given a secure, locked room to store all of your personal belongings. We recommend you wear comfortable clothing and no jewelry. We ask that you arrive for your appointment 15-20 minutes early to fill out any paperwork and to go over any questions or concerns that you may have, as well as discuss procedure and protocol prior to your MRI examination.
How do I obtain my MRI results, and who will explain them to me?

Our radiologist, Dr. Michael Paley, will interpret your imaging, and the results will be communicated to your referring physician, who will then discuss them with you.

What is an MRA?

MRA (Magnetic Resonance Angiography) is the simple, non-invasive study of the veins and arteries of your body using MRI technology. MRA provides detailed imaging of the blood vessels with or without the use of contrast (IV dye). It utilizes MRI technology to detect, diagnose, and assist in the treatment of blood vessel diseases, heart disorders, and stroke. There is no known tissue damage from undergoing an MRA exam.

Why is my physician ordering an MRA?
  • MRA is used to detect disease in the aorta and blood vessels that supply the kidneys, lungs and legs.
  • MRA is a useful way of locating problems with blood vessels and assist in determining the best course of treatment for problems.
  • The carotid arteries in the neck that supply blood to the brain are a common site for atherosclerosis (severe narrowing or blockage of the artery), reducing blood flow to the brain, and in some cases, causing stroke. Stenosis (narrowed areas) is shown using the MRA without causing any pain to the patient.
  • When using MRA to check patients for diseased intracranial (in the head) arteries, only those with positive findings will need to undergo more invasive examinations and, possibly, surgery.
  • Patients with a family history of arterial aneurysm (ballooning out of a portion of a vessel wall) can undergo MRA imaging to rule out a similar disorder that has not yet produced any signs or symptoms. In the event of an aneurysm finding, it may be surgically removed, possibly avoiding serious and/or fatal bleeding.
Is there any special preparation for MRA exams?

No special preparation is required unless IV contrast is ordered. If IV contrast is ordered and the patient has high blood pressure, diabetes, or history of kidney disease, lab results (GFR) must be available within the previous 4 – 6 weeks. If there are no lab results available, the patient must have them done 48-72 hours prior to their MRA appointment. The patient will be asked all of the screening questions again to make sure that no questions were missed. You will be asked to remove all metallic items including clothing with any metal and all jewelry. You will be given a secure, locked room to store all of your personal belongings. We recommend you wear comfortable clothing and no jewelry. We ask that you arrive for your appointment 15-20 minutes early to fill out any paperwork and to go over any questions or concerns that you may have, as well as discuss procedure and protocol prior to your MRA examination. The technologist will need to know if you have any fillings, as this can distort images of the face and brain. Braces make it difficult to adjust the unit. You will be asked to remove all jewelry, hearing aids, hairpins, dental work, etc. Nothing metallic may enter the magnetic field.

Are there restrictions for MRA exams?

Yes. MRA scans CANNOT be performed on patients with a cardiac pacemaker, brain aneurysm clips, metallic fragments in the eye(s), or metallic inner ear prosthetics. For those patients with metallic injuries (metal in the eyes, bullets, shrapnel, etc.), and could not have MRI imaging since the incident, the patient will be asked to have a X-ray done to clear them of any metallic fragments prior to their examination with Insight Imaging. MRI machines use a strong magnetic field which will move metal objects, made with iron or steel, within the body, and can affect the function of electronic devices. The patient will be asked screening questions prior to scheduling, as well as be asked to fill out the MRI/MRA Patient Screening Packet upon arrival to help assure the patient’s safety.

insight imaging faq

What is an MRI?

MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is advanced technology that allows the physician to see internal organs, blood vessels, muscles, joints, tendons, and more. MRI examinations may be ordered with or without contrast (IV dye). MRI is very safe. There are no known harmful effects! MRI will NOT expose you to any ionizing radiation.

 

  • Hand Injuries
  • Parkinson’s
  • Arthritis
  • Stroke
  • Fractures
  • Head Injury
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Joint Replacement
  • Spinal Cord Injury
How does a MRI machine work?

The MRI machine uses the body’s own energy, along with a magnetic field, and highly-sophisticated computers to see through bone to create precise pictures of soft tissue. Radio frequency waves are used to cause hydrogen protons in the body to resonate or “vibrate”. The energy of the “vibration” is collected with an “antennae” (called a coil) in almost the same way as your radio antennae receives signals from a local radio station. The computer then organizes these signals into an electronic image of the anatomy.

Why is my physician ordering a MRI?
MRI provides extremely detailed images of your body unobtainable from other procedures such as X-ray and CT scans without the ionizing radiation that X-ray and CT give. MRI can provide very early detection of many conditions. If there are any abnormalities, MRI can show the location, size, and extent of those abnormalities. The excellent quality of the imaging can provide the best possible information if surgery is required.
For neurological imaging, MRI provides the most sophisticated visualization of the brain and spine available for diagnostic image testing. MRI assists in the early detection and diagnosis of the brain and nervous system disorders including, but not restricted to, MS (Multiple Sclerosis), tumors, stroke, hydrocephalus, spinal disease, and many traumatic injuries. MRI for orthopedic imaging and sports medicine closely visualizes joints, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage.
For Restoration of Physical Function:
  • Decreased upper extremity strength/ROM
  • Unable to sit unsupported
  • Unable to safely negotiate walker or w/c in surroundings
  • Needs assist in bed mobility or transfers
  • Decreased coordination
Are there restrictions for MRI exams?
Yes. MRI scans CANNOT be performed on patients with a cardiac pacemaker, brain aneurysm clips, metallic fragments in the eye(s), or metallic inner ear prosthetics. For those patients with metallic injuries (metal in the eyes, bullets, shrapnel, etc.), and could not have MRI imaging since the incident, the patient will be asked to have a X-ray done to clear them of any metallic fragments prior to their examination with Insight Imaging. MRI machines use a strong magnetic field which will move metal objects, made with iron or steel, within the body, and can affect the function of electronic devices. The patient will be asked screening questions prior to scheduling, as well as be asked to fill out the MRI Patient Screening Packet upon arrival to help assure the patient’s safety.
Is there any special preparation for MRI exams?
No special preparation is required unless IV contrast is ordered. If IV contrast is ordered and the patient has high blood pressure, diabetes, or history of kidney disease, lab results (GFR) must be available within the previous 4 – 6 weeks. If there are no lab results available, the patient must have them done 48-72 hours prior to their MRI appointment. The patient will be asked all of the screening questions again to make sure that no questions were missed. You will be asked to remove all metallic items including clothing with any metal and all jewelry. You will be given a secure, locked room to store all of your personal belongings. We recommend you wear comfortable clothing and no jewelry. We ask that you arrive for your appointment 15-20 minutes early to fill out any paperwork and to go over any questions or concerns that you may have, as well as discuss procedure and protocol prior to your MRI examination.
How do I obtain my MRI results, and who will explain them to me?

Our radiologist, Dr. Michael Paley, will interpret your imaging, and the results will be communicated to your referring physician, who will then discuss them with you.

What is an MRA?

MRA (Magnetic Resonance Angiography) is the simple, non-invasive study of the veins and arteries of your body using MRI technology. MRA provides detailed imaging of the blood vessels with or without the use of contrast (IV dye). It utilizes MRI technology to detect, diagnose, and assist in the treatment of blood vessel diseases, heart disorders, and stroke. There is no known tissue damage from undergoing an MRA exam.

Why is my physician ordering an MRA?
  • MRA is used to detect disease in the aorta and blood vessels that supply the kidneys, lungs and legs.
  • MRA is a useful way of locating problems with blood vessels and assist in determining the best course of treatment for problems.
  • The carotid arteries in the neck that supply blood to the brain are a common site for atherosclerosis (severe narrowing or blockage of the artery), reducing blood flow to the brain, and in some cases, causing stroke. Stenosis (narrowed areas) is shown using the MRA without causing any pain to the patient.
  • When using MRA to check patients for diseased intracranial (in the head) arteries, only those with positive findings will need to undergo more invasive examinations and, possibly, surgery.
  • Patients with a family history of arterial aneurysm (ballooning out of a portion of a vessel wall) can undergo MRA imaging to rule out a similar disorder that has not yet produced any signs or symptoms. In the event of an aneurysm finding, it may be surgically removed, possibly avoiding serious and/or fatal bleeding.
Is there any special preparation for MRA exams?

No special preparation is required unless IV contrast is ordered. If IV contrast is ordered and the patient has high blood pressure, diabetes, or history of kidney disease, lab results (GFR) must be available within the previous 4 – 6 weeks. If there are no lab results available, the patient must have them done 48-72 hours prior to their MRA appointment. The patient will be asked all of the screening questions again to make sure that no questions were missed. You will be asked to remove all metallic items including clothing with any metal and all jewelry. You will be given a secure, locked room to store all of your personal belongings. We recommend you wear comfortable clothing and no jewelry. We ask that you arrive for your appointment 15-20 minutes early to fill out any paperwork and to go over any questions or concerns that you may have, as well as discuss procedure and protocol prior to your MRA examination. The technologist will need to know if you have any fillings, as this can distort images of the face and brain. Braces make it difficult to adjust the unit. You will be asked to remove all jewelry, hearing aids, hairpins, dental work, etc. Nothing metallic may enter the magnetic field.

Are there restrictions for MRA exams?

Yes. MRA scans CANNOT be performed on patients with a cardiac pacemaker, brain aneurysm clips, metallic fragments in the eye(s), or metallic inner ear prosthetics. For those patients with metallic injuries (metal in the eyes, bullets, shrapnel, etc.), and could not have MRI imaging since the incident, the patient will be asked to have a X-ray done to clear them of any metallic fragments prior to their examination with Insight Imaging. MRI machines use a strong magnetic field which will move metal objects, made with iron or steel, within the body, and can affect the function of electronic devices. The patient will be asked screening questions prior to scheduling, as well as be asked to fill out the MRI/MRA Patient Screening Packet upon arrival to help assure the patient’s safety.

meet our imaging center team

Dr. Khaled Hammoud

Radiologist

Dr. Hammoud is board certified in radiology and completed medical school at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine in East Lansing, Michigan. He later completed his transitional medicine year at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Michigan, and his radiology residency at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. He went on to complete his fellowship training in neuroradiology at Harvard Medical School’s Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

As a Flint native, Dr. Hammoud is excited to join the Insight team which will allow him to serve his hometown with compassionate, quality care. His commitment to building meaningful relationships and connecting people to outstanding healthcare will be a welcome asset at Insight and the greater Flint community.

Charity Connor

Insight Imaging Manager

Charity Connor is the Imaging Department manager at Insight Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience. Specializing in administrative healthcare, Charity is responsible for recruiting, selecting, orienting, and training employees. She also oversees a safe, secure, and friendly environment for her patients and staff.

Charity has worked in the healthcare field for over six years and earned her bachelor’s degree in healthcare administration with a minor in psychology from the University of Michigan in December 2020. She plans to continue her education, pursuing a Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree in 2021.

Kris Swanson

Chief Operating Officer

Kris Swanson earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from Alma College in May 2001 and later earned his master’s in business administration from Central Michigan University in May 2002. Since then he has been a manager at INSIGHT since 2012 and has played a crucial role in developing INSIGHT Pain Management when it opened in 2012.

MAKE AN APPOINTMENT

To schedule an appointment, contact our office at (810) 275-9688 EXT# 203 or fill out the form below.

CONTACT INFORMATION

FLINT, MI

4800 S. Saginaw St., Suite 1625 Flint, MI 48507

(810) 275-9688

(810) 963-1900

imaging@iinn.com

HOURS OF OPERATION

MRI & X-Ray
Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
CT
Second Friday of Each Month, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

4800 S. Saginaw St. Flint, MI 48507